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Pupil Premium

Please click on the document below, to download the Pupil Premium Strategy Report document.

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement - September 2020

1. Summary Information
 School  Broadgate Primary School
 Academic Year  2020/21  Total PP Budget

£162,880

 Date of most recent PP review  September 2020
 Total number of pupils  415  Number of pupils eligible for PP  122  Date for next review   July 2021


 

 2. Current Attainment
   Pupils Eligible for PP National Benchmark
 % achieving ARE in reading, writing and maths  No data due to COVID-19  No data due to COVID-19
 % achieving ARE in reading  No data due to COVID-19  No data due to COVID-19
 % achieving ARE in writing  No data due to COVID-19  No data due to COVID-19
 % achieving ARE in maths  No data due to COVID-19  No data due to COVID-19

 

 3. Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP including high ability)
 In-School barriers
 A. Oral language skills in reception and nursery are lower for pupils eligible for PP than for other pupils, particularly following the lockdown period.  This slows progress in other years.
 B. Social and emotional development of PP pupils tends to be lower (particularly in EYFS).  This impacts on their capacity to learn.  This is particularly true of this cohort following the lockdown.
 C. Lack of confidence and resilience in key academic skills.  This impacts on academic attainment.  Pupils need to catch up following a long period out of school, where access to home learning was limited.
External Barriers  
 D. Attendance rates are lower for PP pupils than for other pupils, this affects their attainment.
 E. Home support for PP pupils is not as strong as for other pupils, (i.e. completion of homework and reading at home) and this affects attainment.  This will be a key issue if PP pupils need to access the school’s remote learning offer at any point during the year.

 

 4. Outcomes
  Desired outcomes and how they will be measured  Success Criteria
 A. Improve oral language skills for PP pupils in EYFS.  This may also need to be considered in other year groups follow the extended absence from school for many pupils.

Pupils eligible for PP in EYFS will make accelerated progress by the end of the key stage so that all PP pupils achieve age related expectations.

Pupils eligible for PP in other year groups will also achieve age related expectations by the end of the academic year.
 B. Improve social and emotional well-being of pupils throughout school, focussing particularly on issues caused by the extended absence from school. Pupils feel safe and happy so that they can access learning at all levels, and know where to find support should they need it.
 C. Improve confidence and resilience in key academic skills, through potential catch up programmes and opportunities. Pupils eligible for PP will have higher attainment at the end of KS2, and a higher proportion will achieve age related expectations, particularly across reading, writing and maths.
 D.  Increased attendance rates for pupils eligible for PP (not including any COVID-19 related absences).  Reduce the number of persistent absentees among pupils eligible for PP to 10% or below. PP attendance to improve in line with other pupils.
 E. Increase parental awareness of the value of home support for PP pupils and ensure that PP pupils have access to remote learning opportunities wherever possible. Parents will be able to access in school support to enable them to support their children at home.  PP pupils reading attainment to be in line with non-PP pupils.  We may need to access the DfE offer of additional devices for pupils that need them, or support from Governors.

 

 5. Planned Expenditure
 Academic Year  2020/21
 The three heading below enables school to demonstrate how we are using the pupil premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies.
 i. Quality of Teaching for All
 Desired Outcome  Chosen action/ approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?  How will you ensure it is implemented well?  Staff Lead  When will you review implementation?
 A. Improved oral language skills Focus on developing oral language skills.  Continue withtraded Speech and Language Therapy time (1 day per week). EYFS profile scores indicate low levels of spoken language proficiency and high number of children higher up the school requiring SaLT support.  Pupils in other year groups to also be able to access support where necessary.

Through assessment by the speech and language therapist. Tracking in the Early Years through individual profiles.  Intervention sessions provided by specialist SaLT TA.

Other year groups through termly assessment data.

 K Devlin Summer term Assessments
 B. Improved social and emotional well-being of pupils

Nurture provision and individual and small group sessions (within year groups) provided by learning mentors and teaching staff.

Mindmate lessons to continue.

School development priority on emotional well-being.

High numbers of referrals to cluster guidance and support.  Caseload of the learning mentors.  Evidence from CPOMs.

Through the evidence in the learning mentors tracking files and case notes.  Tracking in EYFS through individual profiles.  Nurture support evidence files.  Games club registers.  Monitoring of Mindmate lessons.  School development priority to be monitored through annual mER calendar.

K Sadler

B Donnison 

E McLellan

At the end of each nurture support programme.    Ongoing as part of MER calendar (link with Well-being SDP priority).
 C. Improved confidence and resilience in key academic skills PiXL - focused and targeted intervention aimed at closing key gaps in learning and understanding.  Baseline assessments from autumn term to inform teachers' planning.  Use of catch-up funding to support those identified with the highest need. End of KS2 results for pupils eligible for PP show that they are significantly lower than for pupils not in receipt of PP.

Raising standards leader will monitor interventions and participate in pupil progress meetings.  Twice termly review with PiXL adviser.  Use of PiXL tracker to be continued across KS1 and KS2.

SLT to monitor any catch-up plans/interventions introduced.

S Qualtrough

E McLellan

Summer term assessments.
Total budgeted cost: £54,915 
 ii. Targeted Support
 A. Improved oral language skills Specific speech and language support from therapist or staff following input from the therapist.  Sessions with specialist SaLT TA. EYFS baseline assessments indicate low levels of spoken language proficiency and high number of children higher up the school requiring SaLT support. Through assessment by the Speech and Language therapist.  Monitored by SENCO.  Targeted support from specialist SaLT TA.  K Devlin Summer term assessments.

 

B. Improved social and emotional well-being of pupils

Small group intervention and nurture support provided by the learning mentors and the behaviour support worker.

Teachers will monitor the well-being of identified pupils and refer any concerns to the pastoral team.

EYFS baseline assessments indicate low confidence and then a high number of children higher up the school requiring SEMH support.
High numbers of referrals to cluster guidance and support.  Caseload of the learning mentors.  Evidence from CPOMs.

Through the evidence in the Learning Mentors tracking files and case notes.
Tracking in EYFS through individual profiles.
Nurture support evidence files.
Continued high levels of staffing support in EYFS.

Results from pupil conferencing.

K Sadler

L Robertson

B Donnison

At the end of each nurture support programme.
 

Through monitoring information.

 E. Increased parental awareness of value of home support

Targeted parenting support groups to improve quality of home/school liaison and support. Regular opportunities to seek the views of parents.

Through termly school tracking data of identified pupils not achieving age related expectations.
Through numbers of participants attending parenting support sessions run by the cluster.  

Through engagement with the school remote learning offer.

Termly pupil progress meetings which then feed into pastoral support meetings.
Evaluations and feedback from parenting support sessions.

Through evaluation of engagement with the school remote learning offer.

 E McLellan
 K Sadler
At the end of the school year through data analysis and pupil progress meeting reviews.
Total budgeted cost: £83,365 
 iii. Other Approaches
 D. Increased attendance rates for PP Pupils

Family mentor to be responsible for meeting parents, doing home visits (when safe to do so) and working with cluster staff for PP pupils whose attendance is causing concern.  Work with cluster to implement penalty notices.

Breakfast club for targeted pupils (year group specific).

Attendance rates across the school fell last year (this was in part due to remaining open on snow days) and there were concerns around specific groups of pupils. Punctuality was also an issue for specific groups of pupils.  Whilst COVID-19 continues to have an impact and COVID related absences are not included in absence figures, we will continue to monitor specific pupils who have historically caused us concern to ensure that we continue to engage those families. Through half-termly monitoring of attendance data, and evaluations of specific interventions (parenting contracts, fast track) for key pupils.  Monitoring of impact of attendance at breakfast club.

E McLellan

K Houston

K Sadler

At the start of next academic year when we have a full year’s attendance data to evaluate (not including COVID related absences).
 Total budgeted cost: £24,600
 6. Review of Expenditure
 Previous Academic Year  
 i. Quality of Teaching for All
Desired outcome  Chosen action/ approach  Estimated impact: did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.  Lessons Learned (and whether you will continue with this approach)  Cost 
Improved oral language skills Focus on developing oral language skills.   Due to the school closing for the majority of pupils in March 2020, and the cancelling of all statutory assessment processes we do not have formal data to evaluate this.  Baseline assessments were completed upon children returning to school in Autumn 2020, however the impact on oral language skills is yet to be fully evaluated. The specialist SaLT TA continues to work with the traded Speech and Language Therapist ensuring that all programmes are maintained and children receive sufficient support.  This will need to be continued as SEN records show that there is no decrease in the numbers of children requiring support (many of whom are PP children).  Some children continued to receive virtual support from the speech and language therapist during the lockdown period.  £31,340
Improved social and emotional well-being of pupils.

Nurture provision and games clubs provided by learning mentors and teaching staff.

Mindmate lessons (SEMH).

Up to March 2020 the behaviour database shows that children targeted for specific interventions benefitted and there was an improvement in attitude and well-being as well as behaviour.  Role models have also benefitted.  

As the school re-opened fully in Autumn 2020, it is yet to be seen what the full impact of lockdown will have on children's emotional and mental well-being.  This is a school development priority for this year.

We need to continue to provide small group SEMH sessions and nurture provision for those PP children that require it (in year group specific bubbles). Mindmate lessons will be continued alongside a specific focus on emotional well-being.  Teachers will be checking on pupils well-being on a daily basis and using Mindmate and PSHE lessons to support the majority.  Any pupils causing significant concern will be referred to the pastoral team/cluster for further support.  £20,975
Improved confidence and resilience in key academic skills. PiXL – focused and targeted intervention aimed at closing key gaps in learning and understanding.  This will be continued from last year as a tool for identifying key gaps in learning following the lockdown.  PiXL resources will be used as a key tool in providing catch-up for those pupils most in need.  Catch-up funding will be used to provide the manpower for this. Due to the global pandemic there is no statutory assessment data for last year, and due to the vast majority of pupils not being in school there is no internal data.  The main focus for this year, is to then identify where the key gaps in learning are and through making use of PiXL resources and DfE Catch-Up funding ensure that the majority of pupils are achieving at age related expectations by the end of this year. The PiXL tracking system is now embedded and helps teachers to identify children who need additional support, however internal data (up to the point at which we had it)  shows that improvements for pupil premium children (particularly in RWM) are still fluctuating.  As we progress through this year the tracking system will help to identify those in need of specific catch-up programmes but also which areas of the curriculum require a more in depth focus (for all children not just pupil premium children) £2600
 ii. Targeted Support
Improved oral language skills Specific speech and language support from therapist or staff following input from the therapist. SENCO records show children receiving SaLT support made good progress (up to the point where schools closed for the majority of pupils), and the use of BSquared has made evidencing progress much clearer. We will continue to use BSquared and train staff new to using it.  We will maintain the increased amount of Speech and Language therapy traded time we have this year and allocate time for the specialist TA to continue her work.  An additional TA has now been employed to work specifically with children who are being assessed using BSquared.

£22,000

 

Improved oral language skills

Improved social and emotional well-being of pupils
Small group intervention and nurture support provided by the learning mentors and behaviour support worker. Nurture assessments show good evidence of children achieving well following completion of a programme. However it was impossible to complete many programmes last year. Strengths and difficulties assessments show evidence of progress made. The challenge this year will be having to maintain year group bubbles which will limit the number of groups it is possible to run. Whilst nurture has proved a successful intervention we have some children who require more specialised therapeutic support – anger management, play therapy.  Our two behaviour support workers provide some of this and we can access further support through the cluster and the Area Inclusion Partnership.  £41,260
Increased parental awareness of value of home support

Targeted parenting support groups to improve quality of home/school liaison and support

Curriculum workshops

Due to the lockdown it was not possible to run parent groups or curriculum workshops.  The pastoral team however, worked tirelessly throughout the lockdown to ensure that contact was maintained with our key families.  There was weekly contact with a large number of families and specific support was provided when required.

One to one work between parents and members of the pastoral team was successful, some of which lead to Early Help Plans.

The Ping communication system has been an essential part of maintaining links with parents, and our Learning Platform will be a key element of our remote learning offer.

At this point we are not considering any workshops due to not being able to have parents in school.  We are instead focussing on finding the most effective ways to maintain links virtually.

£20,105
 iii. Other
 Increased attendance rates for PP pupils Family mentor to be responsible for meeting parents, doing home visits (when safe to do so) and working with cluster staff for PP pupils whose attendance is causing concern.  Work with cluster to implement penalty.

Up until the point where schools closed to the majority the attendance of key targeted pupils was improving significantly.  Where improvements were not being made the Family Mentor made referrals to the cluster for support and in some cases fixed penalty notices were issued.   

The targeted breakfast club has had an impact on the punctuality of key pupils, however we are now limited to only being able to focus on one year group in order to maintain our bubbles.
We must continue to monitor key pupils to ensure that improvements made are not lost.  This will need to take into account any COVID related absences.  The Family mentor is working closely with office staff to monitor this.  The targeted breakfast club will continue to run in the year group identified to have the greatest need.  £24,600

 

 7. Additional Detail

 Data used to inform this report:

  • School tracking data (up to March 2020)
  • School attendance data (up to March 2020)
  • Speech and language therapist notes
  • Nurture evaluations
  • Learning mentor file
  • Guidance and support referrals
  • EYFS profile data (up to March 2020)
  • Pupil progress meeting minutes (up to March 2020)

 

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